If you have a background in Chemistry and are considering becoming a patent attorney read on to find out about the areas of work, entry requirements and to search for live vacancies.

Due to the risks associated with developing new drugs, the tradition of high R&D spending and the ease with which drugs and medicines can be copied, intellectual property plays a significant role in the pharmaceutical industry.

Candidate requirements

Candidates entering this sector are expected to hold a strong chemistry or related degree; a PhD is an advantage but not essential for many firms.

Clients

Clients range from small start-ups and established private companies to large, high-profile multinational corporations. Depending on the firm you join, you could find yourself working with SMEs, research organisations, technology transfer organisations or big pharma.

Areas of work

This sector is extremely diverse and your work will cover a broad range of medical and healthcare technologies, from pharmaceutical chemistry to medical devices. You may find yourself working with:

  • New chemical entities
  • Polymorphs
  • New medical uses
  • Agrochemicals
  • Food technology
  • Gene technology
  • Oil and gas fuels
  • Molecular biology
  • Drug delivery technology.

Remember, a chemistry background does not necessarily limit you to working in the chemical and pharmaceutical sectors, as chemistry is relevant to inventions in many areas of industry.

Employers

Search for the latest Chemistry & Pharmaceutical Trainee Patent Attorney roles now.

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